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chelonaut:

Ain’t no party like a halting problem party because we have no idea if the party will stop

(via luminousalicorn)

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whatiwishicould:

Tips for being an adult:

  • there are none
  • don’t become an adult
  • stay a child forever
  • Peter Pan was right

(via castielscheesecake)

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mustachio-furioso:

marymorstan:

neyruto:

a dystopian novel about some guy who works in the government and is just trying to get by while some shitty kids try and overthrow society

image

(via rampaging-mongler)

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becdecorbin:

kaible:

catbountry:

zygoats:

zygoats:

a kid from my school sent me a pic an elaborate painting of atticus finch shirtless smoking a blunt while a colt 45 is being poured on him along with a text that read “hot dad 2: dad harder” and this is the closest thing to a sext I have ever received

found itimage

You neglected to mention the Tupac and Biggie cherubs how dare you.

look there’s a lot going on here it makes perfect sense that they’d forget some details

(via castielscheesecake)

Tags: faygele
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green-tea-rex:

It’s 1am so I’m sorry for the people who won’t see this. But if you want confidence and don’t know how to get it, a really good way is to be confident in other people. When you walk into Starbucks, think, “damn, that barista’s hair is da bomb!” Or when you go to school, think, “my teacher is rocking that skirt!” When you start seeing everyone as being beautiful, at some point you realize that you’re everyone too.

this is actually a thing that has been happening to me in a way??? it’s weird and also great

(via castielscheesecake)

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appetisers:

HOW DO PEOPLE FALL ASLEEP SO FAST I DON’T UNDERSTAND I HAVE TO CREATE AND ACT OUT A WHOLE FUCKING MOVIE LENGTH STORY IN MY HEAD AND THEN CONTEMPLATE THE MEANING OF LIFE BEFORE I EVEN FEEL TIRED AND THIS BITCH STARTS SNORING IN TWO MINUTES

(via castielscheesecake)

Tags: faygele
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nebulasnovasandnightsky:

look if you unironically say ‘money can’t buy happiness’ then either you’ve never faced a real financial struggle or you’ve achieved enlightenment, because goddamn does financial security feel an awful lot like happiness when it’s something you’re not used to

(via aceticplum)

Tags: mdl
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castielscheesecake asked: it's because the snake eating the moon doesn't leave crumbs but every blood moon it accidentally bites its tongue and bleeds all over the moon and yeah

oh ok that explains it thank

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so i’m trying to find it online and can’t

but why is it so red??

actually i found the answer to that one - it’s the way light scatters through earth’s atmosphere and hits the moon. it’s the same reason the sky is blue, basically. but then, if that’s the case,

why isn’t it half-red in partial eclipses???? why is it black?

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castielscheesecake asked: Oddly enough, my experience with Santa was pretty fake from the start--because even as a small child I stayed up late and on the night before Christmas my mom would close the doors to the den to wrap presents and it was all very "NOPE NOT YOUR MOM WRAPPING PRESENTS" and then "JUST HELPING SANTA" and then "okay you kids can wrap your own presents it's too late at night for this". My parents were never very big for little childhood myth lies like that.

that’s pretty straightforward.

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tenthousandghosts asked: Tumblr makes it hilariously difficult to reply to certain things. ANYWAY! I just don't see the Santa thing being a huge intentional deception just to watch the light fade from your child's eyes. In fact I think most kids learn about Santa from TV or other kids, and parents who don't tell them he's not real just failed to do so and it's not like, intentional in any way. I remember when I stopped believing and it was literally just "oh, yeah, it's my parents anyway yay presents!!"

tenthousandghosts:

momothefiddler:

tenthousandghosts:

momothefiddler:

it’s not the most common reason cited but i have literally had people tell me that santa is good for kids because that way you can teach them to discard false beliefs/not blithely trust authority figures. it’s obviously a justification after the fact but it’s still bullshit

i’ve also encountered people who put forth effort to keep their kid from finding out as long as possible, so that’s certainly intentional. i get the impression from your story that there was a point when your parents did the whole sneak presents under the tree and pretend they got there by magic thing, and didn’t just go good morning congratulations for making it partway through winter here are some presents for you

i’m not aware of a big cultural thing where people grow up believing frosty the snowman is any more real than goldilocks, yet somehow there’s this thing about santa and the tooth fairy etc. and there’s a good reason for that: there’s no evidence for frosty or goldilocks - you expect to see them and don’t, so you treat them as pretend. but santa and the tooth fairy are explicitly called out as invisible and the only evidence for them is easily faked by parents who for some reason continue to fake said evidence.

give your kids money for teeth, sure. give your kids presents on christmas, sure. but why do you gotta lie to them?

I’m laughing at the possibility of a parent dressing their kids for their first day of school and then looking them dead in the eyes and going “Now remember what I told you, when you go there, you may hear tales of this fantastical man in a red suit BUT REMAIN SKEPTICAL MY SIX YEAR OLD, STAY THE COURSE! HE IS A DECEPTION ONLY BROUGHT ON TO HURT YOU! BEWARE THE ST. NICHOLAS!”

Obviously the first set of people, those setting their kids up for a healthy fear of anyone who tells them anything, are just fucking bonkers, but I think otherwise you’re being a tad melodramatic here. Like I don’t think this is a lie in the sense you’re trying to make it seem, that it’s this malicious deception and that kids are being set up to become tragically emotionally scarred just so parents can stand by watching, giggling, and reveling in their child’s lament. I think most parents do it because it’s kind of cute, their parents did it for them, and, (probably just like them) when their kids do grow out of the belief, it’s not anything more than a simple realization that is soon overtaken by excitement for presents because that’s entirely what kids are excited about. Not the fat man. The presents.

What am I trying to say here. I guess I think some lies are ok because they do no harm. I guess I’m ok with that.

i have apparently poorly expressed my position then. i don’t think the majority of parents are sadistic or malicious. i think it’s just a cultural thing. it’s something people do. but, i mean, people didn’t keep slaves out of malice either. (i’m not saying these are the same level of bad; i am merely pointing out that it’s not a defense).

even without malice, setting someone up for an unpleasant disillusionment isn’t a good thing to do. and your argument that it’s just about the presents anyway doesn’t make it any better. sure there’s less pain from the revelation that it’s a lie, but there’s correspondingly less happiness gained from the lie, so what’s the point? why go “yay santa presents”->”oh no no santa?”->”yay parent presents” when you could just go “yay parent presents”?

as a secondary thing, this is all based on the shitty keats-style idea that for something to be wonderful or beautiful it has to be (perceived as) supernatural, and that’s a really gross thing to teach your kids. the only reason to go out of your way to lie about who’s giving the presents is if it’s somehow better to get presents from santa than from your parents, as though magic fat man’s magically conjured presents are special and presents from another human who put work into affording and obtaining them are just boring expressions of love or whatever.

i think a lie that did no harm would be theoretically ok, though lies are pretty high-maintenance and the mere opportunity cost could be considered harm. my contention is that this is not a no-harm lie, and even in the situation you describe where santa didn’t fucking matter, why bother?

Because sometimes people don’t consider like, efficiency in terms of things they do. And like I said, most people probably continue to do it because their parents did it for them. I know for me personally, if my kid came home from school and was like YAY SANTA I wouldn’t say anything, but if they came home and said “Someone told me about a dude named Santa, is he real?” I’d tell them the truth.

Also I think you missed the part in my post where there absolutely wasn’t an “Oh no Santa doesn’t exist” moment for me, and for anyone I’ve asked about this. It’s literally just like, one year you realize he’s not real and it’s not even a minor drop in mood. It just *is*.

I also don’t think that the lie is propped up on this belief that supernatural things are beautiful and better and honestly I think you’re looking way way too deeply into a weird cultural quirk we’ve developed. I don’t think any parents agonize over whether or not to reveal this deception to their kids, and I don’t think there are kids in school trying to push underground copies of “The Santa Delusion” to their fellow classmates in an attempt to topple the lie that keeps them in a choke hold or something.

I just think it’s a super low consequence thing that only becomes problematic in the case where the parents are intentionally doing it to teach their kids about like, disillusionment.

That being said, I do agree that it’s a bit ridiculous overall. I just don’t think it’s of any consequence, even if it’s more “effort” (it really isn’t, you just send your kids to bed and eat the cookies they made and do whatever it is parents do after that. Taxes?) to sustain the lie than it is to tell them the truth.

so i just realized this but in this whole conversation i’ve been taking my lack of santa-lie experience and just treating it as analogous to my other magic-lie experience, which had a long and painful disillusionment process and i’m still not over it years later. they seem very similar to me and maybe that’s just a faulty analogy since apparently the santa revelation is totally fine? i dunno. imma accept your interpretation since you have actual experience with it.

it’s still fuckin weird but i mean so is getting in your metal box and using exploding dinosaurs to go to the place where your trade fabric rectangles for fired seed mash, so

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tenthousandghosts asked: Tumblr makes it hilariously difficult to reply to certain things. ANYWAY! I just don't see the Santa thing being a huge intentional deception just to watch the light fade from your child's eyes. In fact I think most kids learn about Santa from TV or other kids, and parents who don't tell them he's not real just failed to do so and it's not like, intentional in any way. I remember when I stopped believing and it was literally just "oh, yeah, it's my parents anyway yay presents!!"

tenthousandghosts:

momothefiddler:

it’s not the most common reason cited but i have literally had people tell me that santa is good for kids because that way you can teach them to discard false beliefs/not blithely trust authority figures. it’s obviously a justification after the fact but it’s still bullshit

i’ve also encountered people who put forth effort to keep their kid from finding out as long as possible, so that’s certainly intentional. i get the impression from your story that there was a point when your parents did the whole sneak presents under the tree and pretend they got there by magic thing, and didn’t just go good morning congratulations for making it partway through winter here are some presents for you

i’m not aware of a big cultural thing where people grow up believing frosty the snowman is any more real than goldilocks, yet somehow there’s this thing about santa and the tooth fairy etc. and there’s a good reason for that: there’s no evidence for frosty or goldilocks - you expect to see them and don’t, so you treat them as pretend. but santa and the tooth fairy are explicitly called out as invisible and the only evidence for them is easily faked by parents who for some reason continue to fake said evidence.

give your kids money for teeth, sure. give your kids presents on christmas, sure. but why do you gotta lie to them?

I’m laughing at the possibility of a parent dressing their kids for their first day of school and then looking them dead in the eyes and going “Now remember what I told you, when you go there, you may hear tales of this fantastical man in a red suit BUT REMAIN SKEPTICAL MY SIX YEAR OLD, STAY THE COURSE! HE IS A DECEPTION ONLY BROUGHT ON TO HURT YOU! BEWARE THE ST. NICHOLAS!”

Obviously the first set of people, those setting their kids up for a healthy fear of anyone who tells them anything, are just fucking bonkers, but I think otherwise you’re being a tad melodramatic here. Like I don’t think this is a lie in the sense you’re trying to make it seem, that it’s this malicious deception and that kids are being set up to become tragically emotionally scarred just so parents can stand by watching, giggling, and reveling in their child’s lament. I think most parents do it because it’s kind of cute, their parents did it for them, and, (probably just like them) when their kids do grow out of the belief, it’s not anything more than a simple realization that is soon overtaken by excitement for presents because that’s entirely what kids are excited about. Not the fat man. The presents.

What am I trying to say here. I guess I think some lies are ok because they do no harm. I guess I’m ok with that.

i have apparently poorly expressed my position then. i don’t think the majority of parents are sadistic or malicious. i think it’s just a cultural thing. it’s something people do. but, i mean, people didn’t keep slaves out of malice either. (i’m not saying these are the same level of bad; i am merely pointing out that it’s not a defense).

even without malice, setting someone up for an unpleasant disillusionment isn’t a good thing to do. and your argument that it’s just about the presents anyway doesn’t make it any better. sure there’s less pain from the revelation that it’s a lie, but there’s correspondingly less happiness gained from the lie, so what’s the point? why go “yay santa presents”->”oh no no santa?”->”yay parent presents” when you could just go “yay parent presents”?

as a secondary thing, this is all based on the shitty keats-style idea that for something to be wonderful or beautiful it has to be (perceived as) supernatural, and that’s a really gross thing to teach your kids. the only reason to go out of your way to lie about who’s giving the presents is if it’s somehow better to get presents from santa than from your parents, as though magic fat man’s magically conjured presents are special and presents from another human who put work into affording and obtaining them are just boring expressions of love or whatever.

i think a lie that did no harm would be theoretically ok, though lies are pretty high-maintenance and the mere opportunity cost could be considered harm. my contention is that this is not a no-harm lie, and even in the situation you describe where santa didn’t fucking matter, why bother?

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tenthousandghosts asked: Tumblr makes it hilariously difficult to reply to certain things. ANYWAY! I just don't see the Santa thing being a huge intentional deception just to watch the light fade from your child's eyes. In fact I think most kids learn about Santa from TV or other kids, and parents who don't tell them he's not real just failed to do so and it's not like, intentional in any way. I remember when I stopped believing and it was literally just "oh, yeah, it's my parents anyway yay presents!!"

it’s not the most common reason cited but i have literally had people tell me that santa is good for kids because that way you can teach them to discard false beliefs/not blithely trust authority figures. it’s obviously a justification after the fact but it’s still bullshit

i’ve also encountered people who put forth effort to keep their kid from finding out as long as possible, so that’s certainly intentional. i get the impression from your story that there was a point when your parents did the whole sneak presents under the tree and pretend they got there by magic thing, and didn’t just go good morning congratulations for making it partway through winter here are some presents for you

i’m not aware of a big cultural thing where people grow up believing frosty the snowman is any more real than goldilocks, yet somehow there’s this thing about santa and the tooth fairy etc. and there’s a good reason for that: there’s no evidence for frosty or goldilocks - you expect to see them and don’t, so you treat them as pretend. but santa and the tooth fairy are explicitly called out as invisible and the only evidence for them is easily faked by parents who for some reason continue to fake said evidence.

give your kids money for teeth, sure. give your kids presents on christmas, sure. but why do you gotta lie to them?

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momothefiddler:

I’m having a hard time seeing this situation as tragic when the parents are like “omg u guys listen there’s this magic fat man who gives us PRESENTS, just u wait. JUST U WAIT.” and the next day, bam, presents

there is a bit of absurd humor in it, i’ll grant

i feel like eventually the streak of improbable odds will end, though, and the realization that it’s just the grandparents (or possibly that it was the grandparents and your lack of Christmas just compounds the tragedy of their death this year) more than makes up for the little chuckle at the absurdity

i’m being too superserious about this. i don’t actually think you disagree with me (if so though clarify that). it’s just something i’m unusually cranky about at the moment due to the aforementioned dream. i appreciate your humor. i’m just not dealing with it appropriately and i acknowledge that

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I’m having a hard time seeing this situation as tragic when the parents are like “omg u guys listen there’s this magic fat man who gives us PRESENTS, just u wait. JUST U WAIT.” and the next day, bam, presents

there is a bit of absurd humor in it, i’ll grant

i feel like eventually the streak of improbable odds will end, though, and the realization that it’s just the grandparents (or possibly that it was the grandparents and your lack of Christmas just compounds the tragedy of their death this year) more than makes up for the little chuckle at the absurdity